October 20, 2012 Fall Colors

 

I had no plans whatsoever to do any more Fall Color photography for 2012, but my neighbor’s yards are so interesting, I was compelled to shoot more.

 

Nikon D5000 with a Tamron SP 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di VC USD lens shot at F/5 and a 1/1,250 of a second shutter speed.  ISO 500.  Focal length: 175mm.

A dead tree trunk next door (previously seen HERE) with some nice yellow foliage.  This is the view that had me break out my D5000 and start shooting.  I used an ISO of 500 because intermittent clouds had things a bit too dark for hand-held shots.  Many of these were taken using Program mode because I was being lazy.  By the way, at the time of building this page (2 days later), all the yellow you see here is gone.   

 

 

 

Nikon D5000 with a Tamron SP 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di VC USD lens shot at F/14 and a 1/320 of a second shutter speed.  ISO 500.  Focal length: 240mm.

An assortment of leaves (or is it leafs?  I don’t know…) gathered on my garage roof.  I tried to increase my depth of field to have everything sharp, but fell a bit short (look at the top and very bottom of the image; soft).  

 

 

 

Nikon D5000 with a Tamron SP 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di VC USD lens shot at F/8 and a 1/1,000 of a second shutter speed.  ISO 500.  Focal length: 70mm.

I’m not so sure this works; with the dead branch in the background out of focus.  I’d like some more separation of the leaves and the branch, but I do like the colors, so here it is.

 

 

 

Nikon D5000 with a Tamron SP 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di VC USD lens shot at F/5.6 and a 1/2,000 of a second shutter speed.  ISO 500.  Focal length: 300mm.

The Vibration Compensation of my Tamron zoom continues to amaze me.  All these shots were hand-held (again, too lazy to shoot with a tripod).  Granted, I was at 1/2,000 of a second, but hand-holding at 300mm and still getting a decently sharp image is crazy.  Well done, Tamron!

 

 

 

  Nikon D5000 with a Tamron SP 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di VC USD lens shot at F/5 and a 1/100 of a second shutter speed.  ISO 200.  Focal length: 175mm.

The colors of my neighbor Roger Luebeck’s blue truck worked well with the yellow/rust colored leaves.

 

 

Nikon D5000 with a Nikkor 18-70mm F/3.5-4.5G ED lens shot at F/6.3 and a 1/160 of a second shutter speed.  ISO 100.  Focal length: 38mm.

A dead tree trunk in George and Patsy Scott’s yard set up this shot.  Some reds would have been great, but none were around where I took this.

 

 

 

Nikon D5000 with a Tamron SP 70-300mm F/4-5.6 Di VC USD lens shot at F/11 and a 1/125 of a second shutter speed.  ISO 500.  Focal length: 160mm.

Here are the reds.  Back in Roger’s yard and staring straight up at a tree gave me this shot; probably the best of the day.  This was shot in Manual mode; it had to be.  Program mode would have metered off the bright sky and darkened the scene.  By shooting in Manual, I was able to over-expose it and deliver a winner.   

 

 

Nikon D5000 with a Nikkor 18-70mm F/3.5-4.5G ED lens shot at F/6.3 and a 1/160 of a second shutter speed.  ISO 100.  Focal length: 18mm.

This was shot in Program mode so it was originally rather lifeless, until post-processing.  I bumped up the brightness and contrast, and also tweaked the color saturation a bit.  Many often think of Fall color images consisting only of entire trees, but getting in close works really well, as shown here.

 

 

 

Nikon D5000 with a Nikkor 18-70mm F/3.5-4.5G ED lens shot at F/4.5 and a 1/40 of a second shutter speed.  ISO 200. Focal length: 62mm.

The closing shot looking at my back yard.  Taken much later in the day, this wasn’t originally planned.  It has that brooding, “Winter is coming” look, doesn’t it?  I shot this from inside the house, opening a window and resting the camera on the frame for stability.

 

The feedback for the Fall Color shoot on September 23 was rather lackluster, which was unusual.  In the past, my Fall Color efforts brought rather strong reactions.  I still think the 2012 versions are fine images, but oh well.  Today’s shots are not the greatest but they are web-worthy.


all images © Scott Woelm – October 2012